How to Use Web Analytics to Measure Traffic Statistics – Traffic Analysis Stats

Analytics Measure Web Traffic Analysis Statistics

Web Analytics- Measure Pt 1 by Jason OConnor

Web Analytics- Measure Pt 2 by Jason OConnor

Review Web Traffic Analysis Stats by Philippa Gamse

Advertising ROI, Tracking, Traffic Analysis & Cookies by Lee Traupel

Traffic Analysis Options by Merle

Hits, Conversion Ratio & Traffic by Bob McElwain

Hits, Visitors & Pageviews by Scott Buresh

Keys to Web Statistics Analysis by Philippa Gamse

Take the Guesswork Out of Web Site Analysis by Yi Zhou

Mining for Gold in Web Traffic Logs by Philippa Gamse

Traffic Analysis Statistics, Cookies & Tracking by Sage Lewis

Studying Web Traffic Stats by Michael Bloch

Tracking Advertising Click Thrus by Merle

Tracking Single Page Conversion Ratio Rates by Kim Wingate

Visiting Visitors Visits – Web Traffic by Fernando Maci??

Unlocking the Keys to Your Web Site Traffic Analysis

by Philippa Gamse

It is estimated that up to 60% of new traffic to your Web site will come from search engines. This means that unless you are already so well known that people will be using your name to search for your site, you need a search engine strategy. Thousands of new Web sites are created daily, so the axiom “Build it, and they will come” does not apply.

Effective Web site promotion requires a serious and continuing investment of time and resources, whether you do it yourself, or hire a professional. It is not a one-shot deal, but an ongoing process, meaning you should evaluate the return on your investment. You can collect a vast amount of crucial information about your traffic, and make strategic business development decisions, in ways that are unprecedented in the real world.

Setting your goals

We’ve all met the person who boasts of “thousands of hits a day” on his Web site, and maybe we felt a little envious. But let’s debunk the hype . . . .

Your Web Traffic and Your Bottom Line

Author: Scott Buresh

Most companies that have websites have access to traffic statistics, usually provided by their web host. Those that don’t look at these files (or use a bargain basement web hosting company that doesn’t provide them) don’t know what they are missing- there is a wealth of information to be found, and reacting to this information can have a positive impact on a company’s bottom line. What follows are some of the most basic stats that are typically available, followed by brief suggestions on how to use the information.

The Myth of “Hits” Most web surfers have come across sites that boast about “20,000 hits per day” or something similar. But what does this mean? To an internet marketer, unfortunately, not much. “Hits” actually refers to the number of requests for information the web server receives. To use an oversimplified example, if your company homepage has 20 separate graphics on it, each visitor to that page will account for 20 hits. If you were boasting of 20,000 hits per day, you would really only be talking about 1000 visitors. Obviously, this statistic is not a fair indication of actual site visitors, and shouldn’t be figured into your traffic analysis.

Web Analytics – Murder by Numbers – Part 1

by Jason OConnor

Want to know a methodology to learn the exact effectiveness of every e-marketing initiative you conduct? It??s a method that every company online should implement. It??s a must-have if you??re actively trying to leverage your web presence to increase your bottom line.

One of the great aspects of the Internet and e-marketing is its ability to give immediate results and feedback regarding all kinds of online activities. This of course requires tracking.

Let us delve into the world of tracking. Part 1 of this two part series will explain the basics of e-marketing tracking. Part 2 will provide a fool-proof method for website statistical acquisition.

If you rent some banner ad space at a website whose audience is your target market, you can learn exactly how many people saw your banner ad and how many clicked through to your site. You can also determine how many people actually became a lead from the banner ad and even see how many were converted into a sale.

If the numbers were low the first time around, you can create a new banner ad and submit it again, then track those results. You can keep tweaking ad infinitum until you discover the perfect combination of design, copy and presentation that yields the best results. This is one of the wonders of the Net. But you??ll need a way to make sense of all the numbers. And there will be a lot of numbers. Enter Web Analytics.

Here are the most important data points for an e-marketer:

via Web Analytics to Measure Web Traffic Statistics with Live Traffic Analysis Stats.

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Search Engine Specialist - 12 year veteran SEO with multiple top 20 ComScore properties publishing experience. Enterprise level across international, mobile, and social media spheres. Advisor to startups for pre-launch optimization and ongoing SEO consulting.

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